Tag Archives: words

Doris Lessing (b. October 22): “We’re always just a step away from lunacy” & other quotes on writing

22 Oct
lessing_CROP

pinterest.com/pin/39406565465015217/

Doris Lessing (born 22 October 1919, died 17 November 2013) was a British novelist, poet, playwright, biographer and short story writer. She was born in Persia and spent her childhood and early adulthood in South Africa before settling in London. She wrote more than 40 books of fiction and non-fiction, including science-fiction novels and two autobiographical books. She was awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature, the 11th woman and the oldest person ever to receive the prize. 

Quotes on writing:

  1. In the writing process, the more a story cooks, the better. 
  2. Words. Words. I play with words, hoping that some combination, even a chance combination, will say what I want.
  3. I don’t know much about creative writing programs. But they’re not telling the truth if they don’t teach that writing is hard work, and that you have to give up a great deal of your personal life to be a writer. 
  4. You should write, first of all, to please yourself. You shouldn’t care a damn about anybody else at all. But writing can’t be a way of life – the important part of writing is living. You have to live in such a way that your writing emerges from it.
  5. Ask any modern storyteller and they’ll say there’s always a moment when they’re touched with fire, with what we like to call inspiration, and this goes back to the beginning of our race, to fire and ice and the great winds that shaped us and our world.
  6. As you start to write, the questions begin: Why do you remember this and not that? Why remember in every detail a whole week, month, a long ago year, but then a complete blank? How do you know that what you remember is more important than what you don’t?
  7. I’m very unhappy when I’m not writing. I need to write. I think it’s possibly some kind of psychological balancing mechanism – but that’s not only true for writers … anybody. I think that we’re always … just a step away from lunacy anyway, and we need something to keep us balanced.

Hermann Hesse (b. July 2nd): “When dealing with the insane, pretend to be sane.”

2 Jul

Image result for hermann hesse

Hermann Hesse, born 2 July 1877, died 9 August 1962, was a German poet, novelist, and painter. His best-known works include SteppenwolfSiddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946.

10 quotes:

  1. People with courage and character always seem sinister to the rest.
  2. When dealing with the insane, the best method is to pretend to be sane.
  3. Some of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go.
  4. Without words, without writing and without books there would be no history, there could be no concept of humanity.
  5. If you hate a person, you hate something in him that is part of yourself. What isn’t part of ourselves doesn’t disturb us.
  6. The mind is international and supra-national … it ought to serve not war and annihilation, but peace and reconciliation.
  7. Words do not express thoughts very well. They always become a little different immediately after they are expressed, a little distorted, a little foolish.
  8. Knowledge can be communicated, but not wisdom. One can find it, live it, be fortified by it, do wonders through it, but one cannot communicate and teach it.
  9. To study history means submitting to chaos and nevertheless retaining faith in order and meaning. It is a very serious task, young man, and possibly a tragic one. 
  10. To hold our tongues when everyone is gossiping, to smile without hostility at people and institutions, to compensate for the shortage of love in the world with more love in small, private matters; to be more faithful in our work, to show greater patience, to forgo the cheap revenge obtainable from mockery and criticism: all these are things we can do.

 

Doris Lessing (b. October 22): “We’re always just a step away from lunacy” & other quotes on writing

22 Oct
lessing_CROP

pinterest.com/pin/39406565465015217/

Doris Lessing (born 22 October 1919, died 17 November 2013) was a British novelist, poet, playwright, biographer and short story writer. She was born in Persia and spent her childhood and early adulthood in South Africa before settling in London. She wrote more than 40 books of fiction and non-fiction, including science-fiction novels and two autobiographical books. She was awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature, the 11th woman and the oldest person ever to receive the prize. 

Quotes on writing:

  1. In the writing process, the more a story cooks, the better. 
  2. Words. Words. I play with words, hoping that some combination, even a chance combination, will say what I want.
  3. I don’t know much about creative writing programs. But they’re not telling the truth if they don’t teach that writing is hard work, and that you have to give up a great deal of your personal life to be a writer. 
  4. You should write, first of all, to please yourself. You shouldn’t care a damn about anybody else at all. But writing can’t be a way of life – the important part of writing is living. You have to live in such a way that your writing emerges from it.
  5. Ask any modern storyteller and they’ll say there’s always a moment when they’re touched with fire, with what we like to call inspiration, and this goes back to the beginning of our race, to fire and ice and the great winds that shaped us and our world.
  6. As you start to write, the questions begin: Why do you remember this and not that? Why remember in every detail a whole week, month, a long ago year, but then a complete blank? How do you know that what you remember is more important than what you don’t?
  7. I’m very unhappy when I’m not writing. I need to write. I think it’s possibly some kind of psychological balancing mechanism – but that’s not only true for writers … anybody. I think that we’re always … just a step away from lunacy anyway, and we need something to keep us balanced.

Hermann Hesse (b. July 2nd): “When dealing with the insane, pretend to be sane.”

2 Jul

Image result for hermann hesse

Hermann Hesse, born 2 July 1877, died 9 August 1962, was a German poet, novelist, and painter. His best-known works include SteppenwolfSiddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946.

10 quotes:

  1. People with courage and character always seem sinister to the rest.
  2. When dealing with the insane, the best method is to pretend to be sane.
  3. Some of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go.
  4. Without words, without writing and without books there would be no history, there could be no concept of humanity.
  5. If you hate a person, you hate something in him that is part of yourself. What isn’t part of ourselves doesn’t disturb us.
  6. The mind is international and supra-national … it ought to serve not war and annihilation, but peace and reconciliation.
  7. Words do not express thoughts very well. They always become a little different immediately after they are expressed, a little distorted, a little foolish.
  8. Knowledge can be communicated, but not wisdom. One can find it, live it, be fortified by it, do wonders through it, but one cannot communicate and teach it.
  9. To study history means submitting to chaos and nevertheless retaining faith in order and meaning. It is a very serious task, young man, and possibly a tragic one. 
  10. To hold our tongues when everyone is gossiping, to smile without hostility at people and institutions, to compensate for the shortage of love in the world with more love in small, private matters; to be more faithful in our work, to show greater patience, to forgo the cheap revenge obtainable from mockery and criticism: all these are things we can do.

 

Doris Lessing (b. October 22): “We’re always just a step away from lunacy” & other quotes on writing

22 Oct
lessing_CROP

pinterest.com/pin/39406565465015217/

Doris Lessing (born 22 October 1919, died 17 November 2013) was a British novelist, poet, playwright, biographer and short story writer. She was born in Persia and spent her childhood and early adulthood in South Africa before settling in London. She wrote more than 40 books of fiction and non-fiction, including science-fiction novels and two autobiographical books. She was awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature, the 11th woman and the oldest person ever to receive the prize. 

Quotes on writing:

  1. In the writing process, the more a story cooks, the better. 
  2. Words. Words. I play with words, hoping that some combination, even a chance combination, will say what I want.
  3. I don’t know much about creative writing programs. But they’re not telling the truth if they don’t teach that writing is hard work, and that you have to give up a great deal of your personal life to be a writer. 
  4. You should write, first of all, to please yourself. You shouldn’t care a damn about anybody else at all. But writing can’t be a way of life – the important part of writing is living. You have to live in such a way that your writing emerges from it.
  5. Ask any modern storyteller and they’ll say there’s always a moment when they’re touched with fire, with what we like to call inspiration, and this goes back to the beginning of our race, to fire and ice and the great winds that shaped us and our world.
  6. As you start to write, the questions begin: Why do you remember this and not that? Why remember in every detail a whole week, month, a long ago year, but then a complete blank? How do you know that what you remember is more important than what you don’t?
  7. I’m very unhappy when I’m not writing. I need to write. I think it’s possibly some kind of psychological balancing mechanism – but that’s not only true for writers … anybody. I think that we’re always … just a step away from lunacy anyway, and we need something to keep us balanced.

Doris Lessing (b. October 22): “We’re always just a step away from lunacy” & other quotes on writing

22 Oct
lessing_CROP

pinterest.com/pin/39406565465015217/

Doris Lessing (born 22 October 1919, died 17 November 2013) was a British novelist, poet, playwright, biographer and short story writer. She was born in Persia and spent her childhood and early adulthood in South Africa before settling in London. She wrote more than 40 books of fiction and non-fiction, including science-fiction novels and two autobiographical books. She was awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature, the 11th woman and the oldest person ever to receive the prize. 

Quotes on writing:

  1. In the writing process, the more a story cooks, the better. 
  2. Words. Words. I play with words, hoping that some combination, even a chance combination, will say what I want.
  3. I don’t know much about creative writing programs. But they’re not telling the truth if they don’t teach that writing is hard work, and that you have to give up a great deal of your personal life to be a writer. 
  4. You should write, first of all, to please yourself. You shouldn’t care a damn about anybody else at all. But writing can’t be a way of life – the important part of writing is living. You have to live in such a way that your writing emerges from it.
  5. Ask any modern storyteller and they’ll say there’s always a moment when they’re touched with fire, with what we like to call inspiration, and this goes back to the beginning of our race, to fire and ice and the great winds that shaped us and our world.
  6. As you start to write, the questions begin: Why do you remember this and not that? Why remember in every detail a whole week, month, a long ago year, but then a complete blank? How do you know that what you remember is more important than what you don’t?
  7. I’m very unhappy when I’m not writing. I need to write. I think it’s possibly some kind of psychological balancing mechanism – but that’s not only true for writers … anybody. I think that we’re always … just a step away from lunacy anyway, and we need something to keep us balanced.

Ursula Le Guin: “A writer is a person who cares what words mean.”

2 Sep

LeGuin1

“A writer is a person who cares what words mean, what they say, how they say it. Writers know words are their way towards truth and freedom, and so they use them with care, with thought, with fear, with delight. By using words well, they strengthen their souls. Story-tellers and poets spend their lives learning that skill and art of using words well. And their words make the souls of their readers stronger, brighter, deeper.”

~ URSULA LE GUIN

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